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The Agile Dictionary

 

There are different definitions of the acceptance criteria but we will make it simple.

This is defined by Google as“Pre-established standards or requirements a product or project must meet.” and by Microsoft Press as “conditions that a software product must satisfy to be accepted by a user, customer or other stakeholders.”

It is a set of statements detailing a user story that will be tested once coded/developed to check if the feature is in accordance with the user needs. Acceptance criteria state the intent of the user (What) and not the solution (How). These are pass/fail tests that can specify both functional and non-functional requirements; there is no partial acceptance : the criterion is either met or not met. We recommend to use the Given/When/Then format as it makes acceptance criteria easy to understand and consistent.

Ideally, the acceptance tests are subsequently automated by the developers so that they can easily run on all iterations of the software, ensuring that the accepted feature has not been broken by newer code.

Acceptance Criteria

Related Terms:

Definition of Done

Antipatterns are solutions aiming to solve a problem or improve things but actually, end up as ineffective or even result in undesired consequences.

Antipattern

Artifacts are tangible by-products during product development. There are three primary artifacts according to Scrum : the Product Backlog, the Sprint Backlog and the Product Increment. Artifacts are designed to increase transparency of information in the Team and make sure everyone has the same understanding.

Artifacts

The Product Backlog grooming (also known as Backlog Refinement) consists in adding details, time estimates and prioritization order of the different items as well as decomposing large stories into smaller stories or tasks. All items are reviewed and revised. Prioritization is often done with the customer to order items by business value. This is an on-going process but Teams can also schedule meetings or ceremonies to allocate some time to focus on this.

Backlog Grooming

Related Terms:

Backlog Refinement

The Product Backlog refinement (also known as Backlog Grooming) consists in adding details, time estimates and prioritization order of the different items as well as decomposing large stories into smaller stories or tasks. All items are reviewed and revised. Prioritization is often done with the customer to order items by business value. This is an on-going process but Teams can also schedule meetings or ceremonies to allocate some time to focus on this.

Backlog Refinement

Burn Down Charts are graphs that allow you to track the progress of the development of an agile product in terms of work left to do (Y axis) VS time (X axis), at the level of a sprint or of an entire project.

Point value are given to each task, representing units of work, the more complex and time-consuming the task is, the more units of work.

Burn Down Chart

Related Terms:

Burn Up Chart

Burn Up Charts are graphs that allow you to track the progress of the development of an agile product in terms of work done (1st curve), the work left to do (2nd curve) on a Y axis VS time (X axis), at the level of a sprint or of an entire project.

Point values are given to each task, representing units of work, the more complex and time-consuming the task is, the more units of work.

At the level of an entire project, this is a very dynamic graph as the Team will complete work at every sprint but work might also add up within time with new ideas and features being added to the product backlog.

Burn Up Chart

Related Terms:

Burn Down Chart

CRC stands for Class, Responsibilities and Collaborators. The CRC model is a collection of index cards divided into three sections ; class that represents a collection of similar objects, responsibility that represents something a class knows or does and collaborator that represents another class with whom the class interacts to fulfill the responsibility.

CRC Cards

In Scrum, meetings were called „ceremonies“ (now called „events“) to define four important ones within the Scrum framework :

  1. Sprint Planning

  2. Daily Scrum

  3. Sprint Review

  4. Sprint Retrospective

Ceremony

Connextra Format is another term for the role-feature-reason template which is meant to help defining user story in a clear, concise and consistent manner. It is the most common user story format and is presented as follow:

“As a [type of user] I want [some feature] so that [some reason]

Connextra Format

Continuous Delivery is a very similar process to continuous development although in the former process, every piece of code is automatically tested, integrated and goes through automated acceptance tests but is not automatically deployed to production, meaning that the actual release of the functionality is made manually. This allows the company to wait before releasing a new version.

Continuous Delivery

Continuous Deployment is a process where any code commit will pass automatically tests only before releasing it into the production environment. Code will be automatically tested, then automatically integrated, acceptance tests will be run automatically and finally automatically deployed to production. It is aimed to reduce the lead time.

Continuous Deployment

Continuous Integration is the pratice of integrating code changes into the main branch of a repository on a daily basis. Before being integrated to the larger code base, code changes will go through automated tests. One of the popular rules of continuous integration is that developers should never leave anything unintegrated at the end of the day. The purpose is to decrease the duration and work required for each integration episode as well as always having a releasable version at any moment.

Continuous Integration

Customer Development is a 4-step framework developed by the reknown entrepreneur Steve Blank to discover and validate the real customer’s needs, build the right product to satisfy these needs, test the correct methods and models to acquire and convert customers to finally deploy the right resources to scale the business. The four steps are :

  • Customer Discovery : Identify target group and understand their needs or issues

  • Customer Validation: The market is large enough to build a viable product that satisfy the customer’s needs

  • Company Creation : Your business is scalable with the user of Marketing to drive up Sales

  • Company Building : Business can grow with new hires to support demand

Customer Development

The Customer Journey refers to the entire path of interactions that a customer goes through with a company, a service or a product. Customer Journeys can vary in terms of length and scope depending on the nature of the activities. The common Customer Journey represents all the interactions (touch points) happening from the customer being unaware of your existence through becoming aware of the product or company, investigating it, eventually buying it, using it, assimilating it to becoming an advocate for your product or company.

This is summarized into the 5 A’s:

1.     Awareness – 2. Acquisition – 3. Adoption – 4. Assimilation – 5. Advocacy

Customer Journey